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He called it “an unexamined assumption” that is “about to lose its privileged status as the unthinking axiom of public policy.” In 1975, he went on 60 Minutes and reiterated this message.Cullen says Martinson’s work was soon after “reified,” creating a widely accepted “nothing works doctrine” (Cullen 2005).For instance, doing well in a prison’s educational programming or counselling made no impact on recidivism.Further, Martinson’s review found that the length of a sentence had no impact on recidivism.But you’re not going to meet those girls snorting coke at Ceci’s.So I thought the infidelity perception was an anomaly due to sampling bias. I think Latin America is a little more unfaithful than what Gringolandia would consider normal, which I attribute to the Catholic Church prohibiting divorce, and Colombia even more unfaithful than that, which I attribute to it being a den-of-sin kind of culture.Foucault and the “new criminologists” gave rise to a new dogma that saw rehabilitation as “a case of good intentions corrupted for sinister purposes.” After that point, scholars spent little time studying how to make rehabilitation better.According to Cullen (2005), they were “in fact cheering for showing that treatment programs did not work.”Instead, these reformers wanted to set clear sentencing guidelines and legal protections that would be codified in legal statutes.

Highlights: Six of every 10 Latin Americans (63%) admit to having cheated at least once …

Interestingly, Martinson’s views were accepted by both progressive and conservative critics of the criminal justice system.

Progressive reformers criticized the rehabilitative ideal because it put disproportionate power in the hands of the state, and they found that the state used those powers in problematic ways.

Perhaps nobody can be “cured”; perhaps they can only be punished and incapacitated.

In 2004, Francis Cullen (2005), then-president of the American Society of Criminology, reviewed the field of criminology’s response to Martinson’s (1974) article:“Commenting shortly after the article’s publication, Adams (19) noted that this work had ‘shaken the community of criminal justice to its root,’ with many now ‘briskly urging that punishment and incapacitation should be given much higher priority among criminal justice goals.’”Shortly after writing his attack on rehabilitation (1974), Martinson went beyond nothing we do works and suggested that the rehabilitative ideal is itself bogus.

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