Gay dating in nigeria

It banned gay marriage, same-sex “amorous relationships” and membership of gay rights groups with penalties of up to 14 years in prison.“These men were trying to save their lives and make their country better by preventing the spread of HIV,” Alimi told the Thomson Reuters Foundation by phone from Britain, having moved from Nigeria after facing death threats for coming out as gay. Yet the anti-gay law has hindered civil society groups which work with LGBT people in Nigeria, and deterred the community from seeking and sticking with HIV prevention, treatment and support services, rights group Human Rights Watch (HRW) says. so soon after the arrests at the wedding in Zaria,” added Alimi, director of the Bisi Alimi Foundation, which promotes social acceptance of LGBT Nigerians.Reporting By Kieran Guilbert and Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani, Editing by Ros Russell; Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, property rights, climate change and resilience.ABUJA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - A tentative, growing acceptance of gay men and women in Nigeria offers a seed of hope, human rights campaigners said on Wednesday, in a country where the outlawing of gay sex is supported by nine in ten people, according to a new report.A 2017 survey by NOI Polls compared attitudes towards lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people in Nigeria against a 2015 poll.It found a 7 percent increase in acceptance of LGBT people, and a 9 percent rise to 39 percent of those surveyed who think that LGBT people should be allowed equal access to public services such as healthcare, education and housing.

Many African political and religious leaders argue that decriminalising homosexuality would be akin to promoting it and that it goes against their traditions and culture.

Nigeria is not an easy place to have such conversations.” However, the poll showed a 4 percent increase to 90 percent of Nigerians who support the criminalisation of same-sex relationships, and no change in the proportion of Nigerians who believe that the country would be a better place with no LGBT people, also 90 percent.

Former Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan signed a bill in 2014 criminalising same-sex relationships in Nigeria, despite pressure from Western governments to preserve the rights of gay, lesbian and bisexual people.

(meaws) ' was published on Sunday, October 29, 2017.

The short clip is seconds long and it features two men who speak about homosexuality in homophobic Nigeria.

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