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Students examine the history and impact of major religious and philosophical traditions.

Skills listed in the social studies skills strand in subsection (c) of this section should be incorporated into the teaching of all essential knowledge and skills for social studies. The student understands the importance of effective leadership in a constitutional republic.The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation as referenced in the Texas Education Code (TEC), 28.002(h). The student is expected to: (A) describe Richard M. involvement in world affairs, including the end of the Cold War, the Persian Gulf War, the Balkans Crisis, 9/11, and the global War on Terror; (B) identify significant social and political advocacy organizations, leaders, and issues across the political spectrum; (C) evaluate efforts by global organizations to undermine U. sovereignty through the use of treaties; (D) analyze the impact of third parties on presidential elections; (E) discuss the historical significance of the 2008 presidential election; and (F) discuss the solvency of long-term entitlement programs such as Social Security and Medicare. The student understands the impact of geographic factors on major events. free enterprise system such as the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) oil embargo, the General Agreement of Tariffs and Trade (GATT), and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The student understands the economic effects of increased worldwide interdependence as the United States enters the 21st century. The student is expected to: (A) explain actions taken by people to expand economic opportunities and political rights, including those for racial, ethnic, and religious minorities as well as women, in American society; (B) discuss the Americanization movement to assimilate immigrants and American Indians into American culture; (C) explain how the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, gender, and religious groups shape American culture; (D) identify the political, social, and economic contributions of women such as Frances Willard, Jane Addams, Eleanor Roosevelt, Dolores Huerta, Sonia Sotomayor, and Oprah Winfrey to American society; (E) discuss the meaning and historical significance of the mottos "E Pluribus Unum" and "In God We Trust"; and (F) discuss the importance of congressional Medal of Honor recipients, including individuals of all races and genders such as Vernon J. The student is expected to: (A) explain the effects of scientific discoveries and technological innovations such as electric power, telephone and satellite communications, petroleum-based products, steel production, and computers on the economic development of the United States; (B) explain how specific needs result in scientific discoveries and technological innovations in agriculture, the military, and medicine, including vaccines; and (C) understand the impact of technological and management innovations and their applications in the workplace and the resulting productivity enhancements for business and labor such as assembly line manufacturing, time-study analysis, robotics, computer management, and just-in-time inventory management. The student understands the influence of scientific discoveries, technological innovations, and the free enterprise system on the standard of living in the United States.(6) Students understand that a constitutional republic is a representative form of government whose representatives derive their authority from the consent of the governed, serve for an established tenure, and are sworn to uphold the constitution. Painter played a role in protecting the rights of the minority during the civil rights movement. The student understands the impact of political, economic, and social factors in the U. Nixon's leadership in the normalization of relations with China and the policy of dtente; (B) describe Ronald Reagan's leadership in domestic and international policies, including Reaganomics and Peace Through Strength; (C) compare the impact of energy on the American way of life over time; (D) describe U. involvement in the Middle East such as support for Israel, the Camp David Accords, the Iran-Contra Affair, Marines in Lebanon, and the Iran Hostage Crisis; (E) describe the causes and key organizations and individuals of the conservative resurgence of the 1980s and 1990s, including Phyllis Schlafly, the Contract with America, the Heritage Foundation, the Moral Majority, and the National Rifle Association; and (F) describe significant societal issues of this time period. The student understands the emerging political, economic, and social issues of the United States from the 1990s into the 21st century. The student is expected to: (A) analyze the impact of physical and human geographic factors on the settlement of the Great Plains, the Klondike Gold Rush, the Panama Canal, the Dust Bowl, and the levee failure in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina; and (B) identify and explain reasons for changes in political boundaries such as those resulting from statehood and international conflicts. The student understands the causes and effects of migration and immigration on American society. The student understands the economic effects of World War II and the Cold War. The student is expected to: (A) discuss the role of American entrepreneurs such as Bill Gates, Sam Walton, Este Lauder, Robert Johnson, Lionel Sosa, and millions of small business entrepreneurs who achieved the American dream; and (B) identify the impact of international events, multinational corporations, government policies, and individuals on the 21st century economy. The student understands changes over time in the role of government. The student understands the changing relationships among the three branches of the federal government. Supreme Court justices and the presidential election of 2000. The student understands the impact of constitutional issues on American society. The student is expected to: (A) analyze how scientific discoveries, technological innovations, and the application of these by the free enterprise system, including those in transportation and communication, improve the standard of living in the United States; (B) explain how space technology and exploration improve the quality of life; and (C) understand how the free enterprise system drives technological innovation and its application in the marketplace such as cell phones, inexpensive personal computers, and global positioning products. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology.Pershing; (E) analyze the impact of significant technological innovations in World War I such as machine guns, airplanes, tanks, poison gas, and trench warfare that resulted in the stalemate on the Western Front; (F) analyze major issues such as isolationism and neutrality raised by U. involvement in World War I, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the Treaty of Versailles; and (G) analyze significant events such as the Battle of Argonne Forest. The student understands the effects of reform and third-party movements in the early 20th century. The student is expected to: (A) trace the historical development of the civil rights movement in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries, including the 13th, 14th, 15th, and 19th amendments; (B) describe the roles of political organizations that promoted civil rights, including ones from African American, Chicano, American Indian, women's, and other civil rights movements; (C) identify the roles of significant leaders who supported various rights movements, including Martin Luther King Jr., Cesar Chavez, Rosa Parks, Hector P. The major emphasis is on the study of significant people, events, and issues from the earliest times to the present.The student is expected to: (A) evaluate the impact of Progressive Era reforms, including initiative, referendum, recall, and the passage of the 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th amendments; (B) evaluate the impact of muckrakers and reform leaders such as Upton Sinclair, Susan B. Garcia, and Betty Friedan; (D) compare and contrast the approach taken by some civil rights groups such as the Black Panthers with the nonviolent approach of Martin Luther King Jr.; (E) discuss the impact of the writings of Martin Luther King Jr. Traditional historical points of reference in world history are identified as students analyze important events and issues in western civilization as well as in civilizations in other parts of the world.

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