Consolidating debt a

You can consolidate all, just some, or even just one of your student loans.

Consolidating federal student loans may be a good strategy to lower monthly payments or to get out of default, but it is not always a good idea.

There are numerous problems that can arise–for example, if one of the divorced ex-spouses wants to apply for IBR.

The Department says that borrowers with joint consolidation loans may repay under the IBR/PAYE plan as long as both spouses qualify with partial financial hardships.

The good news is that the Department explains on its web site that if any loan you want to consolidate is still in the grace period, you can delay entering repayment on your new Direct Consolidation Loan until closer to your grace period end date.

However, the interest rate may be greater than 8.25% if your consolidation application was received on or after July 1, 2013.

Direct consolidation loans are now the only type of federal student consolidation loan.

Under the Direct Loan Consolidation Program, you can consolidate Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford Loans, Supplemental Loans for Students (SLSs), Federally Insured Student Loans (FISLs), PLUS Loans, Direct Loans, Perkins Loans, Health Education Assistance Loans (HEALs), and just about any other type of federal student loan.

This may be a good idea if you want a single monthly payment.

You may also be able to get a better deal if, for example, your credit score is better now than it was when you first took out the private loans.

Leave a Reply